Colombo is like a throbbing pulse. Busy, bustling, and bursting at its seams. Nevertheless, this capital city is full of surprises; breathtaking, mysterious and fascinating.

Colombo is also home to four of the oldest and intriguing places of worship belonging to the four main religions in Sri Lanka, and I am on a journey with Arshad, my most learned guide, to discover the history and evolution that make these places so revered.

Seema Malaka

I start at Seema Malaka, the floating Buddhist monastery on one of Colombo’s oldest waterways, the Beira Lake. It is a sublime and serene surrounding where Buddhists come to meditate, offer flowers and light incense sticks.

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Vastly ignored and hardly appreciated, the Nalanda Gedige, once the most central point in ancient Ceylon is a remarkable archaeological site with an interesting story, some fascinating carvings and historical significance.  

According to former Commissioner of Archaeology, Prof. Senerath Paranavitana, there is inscriptional evidence that this was built during the 8th and 9th centuries as an ancient Hindu temple. The Dravidian-style (Pallava) architecture is dedicated to a Mahayana cult with Tantric learning. Subsequently, it is believed to have been used by Buddhist monks. 

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“Epic”. “Stunning”. “Awesome”. “Scenic”. “Asia’s Best”

These are just some of the adjectives used to describe the train ride from Colombo to Ella and a reason to find out for myself.

It is 5.55 a.m on this Friday morning when 35 like-minded friends and adventurers meet (and greet) at Colombo’s Fort Railway Station to catch the “Podimenike” train heading towards Badulla. The railway station is abuzz with activity as travelers’ scramble to get on board this ten-carriage train.

Three hours later we reach Kandy, and hereon, for the next six hours, is where the scenery changes into some of the most stunning sights one can experience on a train ride. At Rambukkana, the train begins its steep climb into the hills.

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Visiting New York is exciting. At any time of the year. I’m in this city for a conference. Acer is launching its newest range of tech devices and I’ve flown all the way out here to be a part of this exciting event, happening at the Alice Tully Hall at Carnegie Hall.  

Post event, I’m on my own to explore this city that never sleeps. It’s been a hectic week but here are some of my favourite memories from New York. 

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Last, but not least, I’m now in Denmark’s capital, Copenhagen. And as expected, it’s all about colourful homes, waterside cafes, boats and canals, and of course the inimitable mermaid. It is, I’m soon to find out, also one of the more expensive destinations I have been to. 

But first, I have to check in to the Generator Hostel. I have to admit that this is the first time that I am staying at an actual hostel. Located smack bang in the center of the city on Kongens Nytorv, the Generator is buzzing…the vibe, the visitors and the visceral indulgences…all get a 10/10 from me.  

Kongens Nytorv

Kongens Nytorv is a central old square and home to prominent institutions such as the Royal Theatre, the D’Angleterre Hotel and the Charlottenborg Academy. The square was constructed in 1908, is encircled by buildings on five sides, was paved with cobblestones in 1670, and the equestrian statue of Christian V on horseback was raised in 1688. It is the oldest equestrian statue and royal sculpture in Copenhagen.  

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